Bouncing Soles Running Blog – Covering races and events in the Philadelphia area

1May/150

Trail Runner Nation – Tips for Racing and Running

Posted by Patrick Durante

My favorite running podcast is Trail Runner Nation.  If you haven't heard of it stop now and go check it out.  I've listened to most of the shows in their library.  There are so many good quotes and tips for training.  Here are just some of the ones I've written down, and my thoughts on the different topics.  I'm sorry I don't know what episode, or who said them, but just go listen and you'll find out.

  • You never know where your last finish line will be. You are lucky to get to do this so enjoy it, smile, and have fun out there.
  • If you plan a quality workout also plan quality recovery. The day following a hard workout needs to be easy. You need more recovery as you age. Listen to the signs your body gives you!
  • Invisible training - it's getting sleep and everything we need for recovery.  That could be lots of rest, yoga, foam rolling, etc...
  • Road and speed require more "invisible training" than trail.  The trail is not as hard on the body as road running and racing can be.
    • ** This made me think about giving up all road racing next year.  I really agree with this. **
  • Work on leg turnover, it needs to be in your schedule. Try the Yasso track workout.
  • If you put miles in the bank you will pay interest on them later. So go out slow in a race.
    •   Don't be an idiot first half, and dont be a wimp the second.
    •  "Run with the mayor" at the start of the race. (Run in the back and work your way up through the crowds.)
  • Cramping occurs from dehydration , low electrolytes, or running at an intensity the body can't sustain.  Train for race and test the pace!!!!!
  • Listen to your body. Take note of what you are doing during training. How much you sweat, pee, and how much food you need. It's all rehearsal for race day. Adaptations happen over time and you need to know what you were doing when things go right, just as much as when they go wrong.  Have a change log if you modify things with your routines/training.
  • Even if it's just 5 minutes a day try to start a routine. A body in motion stays in motion.
  • Save music for later in a race when you are not feeling good, or as a reward at a certain mile marker.  It may give you more motivation.
  • As mileage increases so should rest, stretching, good nutrition, and massage. Take care of the body more so it recovers better from the stress.
  • Have an "A" race and "B" race. Focus the effort and training to the more important race.  Have an "A" goal then "B" goal for the race itself.
  • More supportive shoe on race day.
    • You should have many shoes that work the foot in different ways. Race in a shoe with heel support because of added strain. Train in zero drop if you can work it in slowly.
  • Finish fast on long runs. Simulate what happens in a race. In training test running hard while you are dehydrated and have tired legs.  This will help you train for race day.
  • Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement.
  • Drink to thirst.  Don't be waterlogged and wash out electrolytes come race day. You should not be peeing clear come race day.  Don't eat too much fiber. Take S caps before the race will prevent the need to pee. You need electrolytes to process fat and food, if you don't you may have stomach issues. If you don't have electrolytes then water and food that enters the body will be rejected. Take an s cap or hammer tab so you have the right balance.  (Really applies to longer races).
  • Visualize the race and how it will play out. Do it daily up until race day. See yourself successful and running the course to completion.  A good time to practice this is when you go to bed at night.
  • Race specificity - mimic the next race course and conditions during your training.
  • Don't let your feet or arms cross over the middle of your body.  Perform an inventory check while running on your form every 10 - 15 minutes.  This is even more important as we start to fatigue.  When we get tired our form starts to suffer.  
  • Your training should be on a cycle.  3 weeks at regular intensity with the 4th week at 20 percent less mileage/intensity. This allows time for the body to adapt to the training.  The benefits from training come when you take a break.  It gives your body a chance to rebuild.  If you're always going at 100% you never give your body a chance to repair.
  • Mental rehearsal before a big event increases chances of success.
  • Be autonomous!  Know everything there is to know about your body.  Know how much sleep you need, how much recovery, water, and food you need on a run.  You're an experiment of 1.  Use your training to test different methods of fueling and pacing.  Practice!  This comes back to the idea of rehearsal for success.
  • Slow weights - see Phil Maffetone
30Nov/140

2014 Running Notes – Tips for a better season next year.

Posted by Patrick Durante

If I PR in just one distance, or place in a race I say my season was a success. I was second for the Upper Dublin Duathlon, and I took 6 minutes off of my marathon.  These are a few of my lessons from the past year I'll take with me.  I also started a new training method mid-season so I have even higher hopes for next season.

  • Strength is critical late in the race. I have to focus more on strength.  I knew this but still neglected strength training for some reason.
  • Get your feet to the ground as quick as possible. I need to have incredible fast turnover while running. Do not spend excessive time in air.  Vertical motion wastes energy.
    • Over striding causes injury, uses more energy and is the biggest mistake people make with running.
      • I noticed lower heart rate the quicker I get my turnover.
  • Diet can slow recovery.
    • If you work out every day your body is in constant repair.  Eat food that promotes recovery.
    • Focus on more healthy fat / protein.  Train your body to use fat as a fuel source.  You will get less inflammation in joints and muscles depending on what you eat.  Excessive carbohydrates and refined sugar are not healthy and turn into fat.
    • Diet change can help get rid of the nagging injuries.
  • The race profile must match training.
    • You have to match the race elevation profile in training.  You can't just expect to deal with a 1000 extra feet of climbing if you didn't train for it.
  • In the marathon there are no surprises so don't expect much better than training.
    • For longer distance races, you need to have quality training sessions.  There are no surprises that will happen race day, if you haven't had some breakthrough in training.
  • Keeping low HR means quicker recovery, and more quality workouts.
    • This is also a form of injury prevention.  Using a HR monitor helps limit workout stress.
    • Lower perceived effort makes it easier to run faster.
  • When dining out always choose the low carb option and drop unnecessary sugar.
    • Wraps and salads.
    • Do not have excessive sugar with your meals.
    • Our bodies can't use nearly as much energy as we take in with refined sugar.  The rest turns to fat, skip it when possible or have very small portions if necessary.
  • Race pace should be set and maintained the ENTIRE race.
    • Don't fly off the start!
    • Don't chase.
    • Put the ego aside.
    • Have a plan and execute it.

If I can remember these for next year I should have a better season then the last.

2Nov/140

Lesson of the day: Pacing

Posted by Patrick Durante

As my season comes to an end I'm excited for next year.  I've had a poor performance at the Blues Cruise 50K, but other than that it went well.  I did learn a very painful lesson, but it helped me realize some of my shortcomings.  I need to be patient and put my ego aside.  That means setting the correct pace when the race starts, not getting swept up with the front runners, and not heading out too fast.  Let people pass you!!  Odds are if they fly out at the start you will catch them,  if you can run a consistent pace.  I did the exact opposite with that race and I deserved the outcome.  I also noticed I was about 1000 feet short in training for the elevation.  There should be no surprise come race day.  You should have run the distance, pace, and elevation profile before the race.

A few months back when I started with the Maffetone method, things were going very well.  My MAF tests were improving, and my weight was dropping from the new diet.  I stopped weight and anaerobic training workouts because of the unwanted stress.  I would say that both of those things combined ended up hurting me during the race.  It's not that the fault of the Maffetone method, it's just that it should not be implemented in the middle of your season.  If you are looking to convert to his style of training, it really should be started in the off season.  This gives you plenty of time to build a cardio base.  Once that's complete, you can add in the other components, like strength and anaerobic workouts.  Don't get me wrong, it definitely works.  At the end of my season I have been running very consistent times, and have had a few PRs at different distances.  I hope to take 10 minutes off of my marathon time with my final race of 2014.  I've been seeing the results in my training, so it won't be any surprise come race day.  The hardest part is implementing the plan come race day.  If you set the pace too high you could put yourself in an anaerobic state.  Once that happens it is hard to get back to where you are running aerobically.  Keep a constant eye on your heart rate monitor and set alerts if it gets too high.  This is what happen to me at Blues Cruise, and that's why I had such a difficult time in the race.

This was a learning process for next year.  I know the things I should change next season.  Perfect pacing!!  It's the most important lesson you can learn as a runner.  Almost every long distance running record has been set while running even or negative splits. The men's world records in the 10,000 meter run, two were run with nearly identical splits for the first 5k and second 5k, and the other three were run with the second 5k being as much as 13 seconds faster than the first 5k.  That's proof that you need a plan and pace set before EVERY race.  During your training, you should have been running at a pace you can sustain.  Running with a HR monitor is just a form of pacing.  It forces you to be consistent with your effort and that's the most critical part of the Maffetone method.  There are some exceptions, if it's a hilly course you need to be conservative on hills, and for hot days you may need to slow your pace.  The wind can also play a factor as well, so set your pace accordingly.  When the race starts it should be easy.  The perceived effort is always low in the beginning.  You should not be passing people, and that's where most people get in trouble.  It's hard to put your ego aside, or not get swept up with the crowd.

I've realized that running is 3 things: diet, strength, and a good cardio base according to the Maffetone method.  Master those things with a set pace for race day and you'll get the time/PR your trying to achieve.